[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.168.204. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 8, 1948

PHYSICAL TREATMENT OF ARTHRITIS

Author Affiliations

Cleveland

From the Department of Medicine of Western Reserve University School of Medicine at City Hospital, Cleveland.

JAMA. 1948;137(2):128-130. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02890360010002
Abstract

A difficult problem for most physicians is what to do for their patients with chronic arthritis. Unfortunately as yet there is no specific therapy; however, the physical methods are available and when properly and consistently used can be the most important single factor in the treatment of these patients. To be sure, since we are physicians we consider all the various medications, injections, diet, psychotherapy, surgery, etc., that are indicated, but I believe the statement can be made that, if one is deprived of everything else, one can depend on the physical agents to improve these patients both subjectively and objectively.

These measures to be most effective must be used frequently—that is, every day or even several times during the day. This means that the patient should be instructed on what to do in his home and calls for specific directions and methods that are relatively convenient, safe and inexpensive.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×