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Article
March 12, 1955

DRAMATIC RESPONSE TO CORTISONE THERAPY IN A CASE OF SERUM NEURITIS

Author Affiliations

Greenville, S. C.

JAMA. 1955;157(11):906-907. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950280030010

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Abstract

One of the unhappy complications of administration of blood serum for any purpose is neuritis, which is often excruciatingly painful and frequently leads to permanent damage. Heretofore, therapy has not been particularly successful; we wish to report a case in which the response to cortisone was dramatic.

REPORT OF A CASE

A 37-year-old white man was first seen by us on Sept. 12, 1951. Twenty-two days earlier, he had accidentally impaled his right thigh on a bush he was cutting. It had become infected, and he had gone to see his doctor after six days, at which time the wound was opened widely and the patient was hospitalized. During the eight days while the patient was in the hospital, he received three injections of tetanus antitoxin. The day after discharge he began to complain of pain in his right shoulder; this later spread to the left shoulder, left arm, and

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