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Article
March 26, 1955

PHARYNGOCONJUNCTIVAL FEVEREPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF A RECENTLY RECOGNIZED DISEASE ENTITY

Author Affiliations

Bethesda, Md.

From the U. S. Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Microbiological Institute.

JAMA. 1955;157(13):1083-1092. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950300011003
Abstract

Through the interest and cooperation of private practicing physicians and health officers in the various communities of metropolitan Washington, D. C., and Leesburg, Va., we observed over 300 cases of an acute respiratory illness that appears to represent a newly recognized communicable disease entity. In brief, the clinical disease was characterized by fever, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis, occurring either singly or in combination. A newly discovered virus, adenoidal-pharyngeal-conjunctival (APC) type 3, was recovered from 80 of the patients, and a specific serologic antibody response was found in practically every patient tested. Epidemiologically, cases occurred in all age groups but predominantly in children. The disease occurred in epidemic form in a summer day camp and in two residential neighborhood outbreaks, and it has occurred sporadically throughout the area. The disease was apparently infectious and spread from person to person, with an incubation period of five to nine days.

The adenoidal-pharyngeal-conjunctival viruses are

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