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Article
April 2, 1955

LOCALIZATION OF INTRACRANIAL LESIONS BY SCANNING WITH POSITRON-EMITTING ARSENIC

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Medicine and Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1955;157(14):1183-1188. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950310009002
Abstract

Moore1 first reported in 1948 his pioneer efforts to localize brain tumors by external counting of the gamma radiation from diiodofluorescein labeled with iodine 131. The method consists of intravenous injection of the radioactive substance and subsequent measurement of gamma radiation emerging from the head by means of a suitable detector placed at various positions on the scalp. The presence of a tumor is indicated by a reading of asymmetrical activity or by divergence from a pattern of normal observations. At the same time, Selverstone and Solomon2 were demonstrating that the beta emitter phosphorus 32 injected as the phosphate would also localize in brain tumors. The localization and demonstration of these lesions by a probe counter during operation has since become an accurate, routine procedure with us.3 The precision of the method has been shown in postmortem material by Selverstone and White.4 A useful technique for

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