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Article
April 2, 1955

Human Factors in Highway Transport Safety

JAMA. 1955;157(14):1262-1263. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950310088028

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Abstract

The research team approach to one of the serious problems of our time has paid off handsomely in this volume. Specialists in the fields of medicine, anthropology, physiology, engineering, psychology, and psychiatry collaborated to produce this critical examination of the many factors within and around "John Doe" as a truck or bus driver that have a bearing on his chance of being involved in traffic accidents. The subject is handled in highly satisfactory style. Each chapter presents a comprehensive yet compact review of the various elements involved, without the usual minutiae characteristic of so many research reports.

Although our national traffic accident record is appalling and shameful, there is not much evidence that the generalized safety campaigns are having any noticeable effect on the total situation. Fortunately, the operators of fleets of trucks or buses are in a good position to accomplish positive results through the proved techniques of organization,

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