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Article
April 30, 1955

ROLE OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL IN INDUSTRIAL AMERICA

Author Affiliations

Denver

President, University of Colorado.

JAMA. 1955;157(18):1587-1590. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950350001001
Abstract

The word "medicine," to use it in its broadest sense, represents an area of human endeavor that has ramifications extending into all phases of the structure and function of our society. In fact, medicine is a function of society. I can think of no art or science, no human interest or enterprise, that does not take from, add to, or depend on medicine in one way or another. The increasing effectiveness of medicine and the fact that continued research and the proper education of medical personnel will increase this effectiveness justifies the implications of this statement; but I think that people are taking medicine's effectiveness for granted and that they fail to appreciate the magnitude and the complexity of the educational enterprise that is essential to this effectiveness. It is the magnitude and the complexity of this educational enterprise that I shall discuss. In giving you an understanding of this,

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