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Article
June 11, 1955

CLINICAL ASPECTS OF GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL BREATHINGREPORT OF USE BY ONE HUNDRED POSTPOLIOMYELITIC PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

Hondo, Calif.

From the Rancho Los Amigos Respiratory Center for Poliomyelitis and the departments of Physical Medicine and Internal Medicine, College of Medical Evangelists, Los Angeles.

JAMA. 1955;158(6):445-449. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02960060003002
Abstract

Several years ago one of the postpoliomyelitic patients at the Rancho Los Amigos Hospital was observed to be breathing in a peculiar manner, using his mouth and throat in what at first appeared to be a swallowing motion. Further observation revealed that these movements aided in breathing. With them he could breathe for many hours; otherwise he could breathe unassisted for only a few minutes. Vital capacity measurements were taken with and without the assistance of these movements and were found to be 600 ml. and 150 ml. respectively. This manner of breathing was observed in other patients, some of whom had learned it unassisted, while others had learned it from fellow patients. The first 15 cases have been reported previously.1 The present report of 100 cases includes these 15 cases.

Because of the structures involved, we have called this procedure "glossopharyngeal breathing." It is also being called "gulping"

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