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Article
September 10, 1955

TOXEMIA OF PREGNANCY AS AN ETIOLOGICAL FACTOR IN HYPERTENSIVE VASCULAR DISEASE

Author Affiliations

Memphis, Tenn.

From the Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee College of Medicine and the City of Memphis Hospitals.

JAMA. 1955;159(2):105-109. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02960190011004
Abstract

Although many reports have appeared describing follow-up findings in thousands of patients with previous toxemia of pregnancy, no clear-cut answer can be found to the question of whether toxemia of pregnancy is an etiological factor in the development of permanent hypertensive vascular disease. The variation in available data is illustrated by the fact that previous reports have placed the incidence of hypertension following toxemia from 0 to 78%. The average reported incidence following preeclampsia is 45%, and that following eclampsia is 22.5% approximately one-half as much. This tremendous variation might be explained in part by the lack of uniformity of criteria for a diagnosis of toxemia and post-toxemic hypertension. The reported level of blood pressure constituting hypertension has varied from 130/70 to 170/100 mm. Hg. Today most investigators consider 140/90 mm. Hg as the dividing line between a normal blood pressure and hypertension. Master, Dublin, and Marks1 have shown

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