[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 17, 1955

ASSOCIATION OF MATERNAL AND FETAL FACTORS WITH DEVELOPMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY1. ABNORMALITIES IN THE PRENATAL AND PARANATAL PERIODS

Author Affiliations

Baltimore; Buffalo

From the departments of public health administration (division of mental hygiene) and epidemiology, the Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health (Dr. Pasamanick) and Chief, Department of Statistics and Epidemiological Research, Roswell Park Memorial Institute (Dr. Lilienfeld). Dr. Pasamanick is now at the Columbus State Psychiatric Institute, Ohio State University Health Center, Columbus 10, Ohio.

JAMA. 1955;159(3):155-160. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02960200001001
Abstract

It has been repeated frequently within recent years that mental deficiency is not in itself a clinical entity but rather a symptom present in a large number of diseases of varying etiology.1 This symptom, present according to different estimates in from 1 to 2% of the population of the United States, is probably the most serious single public health problem from the point of view of chronicity, cost of care, loss of productive and earning capacity, and tragedy in the family. Within this century the thinking concerning the etiology of this entity has swung from considering the majority of cases of mental deficiency to be of hereditary or familial origin to the belief that only a small minority of cases falls within this category.2 As an increasing number of exogenous factors has become causally implicated, the so-called endogenous role of heredity that had previously been applied largely on

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×