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Article
December 11, 1948

SHALL ARMY MEDICINE BE CONTROLLED BY THE DIRECTOR OF LOGISTICS?

JAMA. 1948;138(15):1100. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02900150030010

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Abstract

The place of the Medical Department in the staff organizations of the three armed services has become increasingly the concern of medicine and its allied professions during the past ten years. During this period about one half of the practicing physicians of this country have served in the armed services. Probably no other profession or occupational group has contributed so high a percentage of its members to the service of their country.

Among the various factors that have troubled physicians during their tours of duty in the armed services and, particularly, those who have served in the Army, is the placing of medicine among the services of supply. From the philosophic (and unfortunately practical) point of view, those who guide the destiny of the Department of the Army have considered the provision of medical and allied services a supply problem, of a nature similar to that of providing food or

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