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Article
January 15, 1949

MEDICAL CARE OF THE NATION IN THE EVENT OF ANOTHER WAR

JAMA. 1949;139(3):135-138. doi:10.1001/jama.1949.02900200005002
Abstract

It is now barely a year since the Council on National Emergency Medical Service outlined its concept of its task to the Board of Trustees and the House of Delegates and started out toward its accomplishment. The survey that the association had just completed through the magnificent work of the Bureau of Medical Economic Research at the behest of the Bortz committee had pointed up in bold relief some revealing facts concerning the excessive procurement of civilian doctors for military duty in the recent war and, particularly important, some astounding facts concerning their incomplete and at times inept utilization.

Through the insatiable demands of the military establishment the civilian population was stripped of its physicians to a degree that invited national disaster. There remained but one physician, in many instances well along in years and in some even recalled from retirement, to take care of 1,500 civilians presenting all the

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