[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.150.215. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 14, 1956

TREATMENT OF MALE INFERTILITY WITH LARGE DOSES OF TESTOSTERONE

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Albert Einstein Medical Center, Southern Division.

JAMA. 1956;160(2):98-101. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02960370008002
Abstract

• The administration of a standard course of testosterone in a series of subfertile male patients resulted, as a rule, in the disappearance of spermatozoa from the semen after 12 weeks. After termination of this treatment, spermatozoa reappeared in two or three months. While in some cases the sperm counts returned to the pretratment level, in others they failed to reach it during the period of observation and in some they exceeded it (rebound phenomenon).

The selection of patients must be governed by determinations of urinary gonadotropin excretion and by testicular biopsy, especially the latter. In one initially azoospermic patient the rebound phenomenon was observed twice and a peak count of 30 million spermatozoa per cubic centimeter was achieved. In this instance a pregnancy followed, with subsequent normal childbirth.

×