[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.147.238.168. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 14, 1956

SOME HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF THE WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION

JAMA. 1956;160(2):120. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02960370030009

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The most controversial feature of the recent White House conference was the question of federal aid for education. Interestingly enough, conference recommendations on this question were comparable with those of medicine in relation to medical education. Delegates, unanimously as far as could be judged, wanted no part of federal control of education. A strong majority reportedly favored federal aid for building construction and renovation. There was vigorous opposition to any federal aid for educational operations; however, federal aid was only one of several questions discussed. One of the others in particular had significant implications for the health of school-age children.

This was the issue of crowded school conditions. Delegates agreed that under present plans it is "virtually impossible" for most states to meet school building needs. This means too many children crowded into some schools, double sessions for others, too long bus rides for others, and the occupancy of unsafe

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×