[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.166.48.3. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 4, 1956

POSTANESTHETIC NAUSEA, VOMITING, AND RETCHINGEVALUATION OF THE ANTIEMETIC DRUGS DIMENHYDRINATE (DRAMAMINE), CHLORPROMAZINE, AND PENTOBARBITAL SODIUM

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the Anesthesia Laboratory of the Harvard Medical School at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

JAMA. 1956;160(5):376-385. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02960400034009
Abstract

• The antiemetic possibilities of three drugs were studied in 554 surgical patients who were divided into five groups by using a table of random numbers. The contratest group (a) received a placebo in ampuls identified only by code letters; the test groups received (b) chlorpromazine, (c) 100 mg. of pentobarbital, (d) 150 mg. of pentobarbital, and (e) dimenhydrinate. The anesthesia was nitrous oxide—ether.

Dimenhydrinate and pentobarbital in the 100 mg. dosage were ineffective. Pentobarbital in the 150 mg. dosage and chlorpromazine effectively reduced postoperative nausea, vomiting, and retching, but they seriously lowered blood pressure and delayed awakening; in addition, the pentobarbital caused confusion and excitement. None of the four antiemetic procedures tried can be recommended for routine postoperative use.

Considerable protection against emetic symptoms was afforded by 150 mg. of pentobarbital given with a gastric tube in place. Females had more postoperative emetic symptoms than did males, but no difference was found in a comparison of intraperitoneal with extraperitoneal operations.

×