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Article
March 3, 1956

SPECIAL ARTICLE

JAMA. 1956;160(9):768-774. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02960440040011
Abstract

FACTS AND FEELINGS ABOUT NEWSPAPER MEDICAL COVERAGE 

2. SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION, EXAMPLES, AND PROBLEM OF MEDICAL ETHICS  Harry A. Wilmer, M.D., Ph.D., Menlo Park, Calif.In the early part of this century the medical profession did not look with much trust upon the press. Sir William Osler wrote, "Believe nothing that you see in the newspapers—they've done more harm to create dissatisfaction than all other agencies. If you see something in them that you know is true, begin to doubt it at once."

Medical Ethics Versus Newspaper Coverage  In 1847 a code of ethics was adopted by the American Medical Association in one of its first moves in the fight against quackery. It stated that solicitation of patients by physicians through publication of advertisements by whatever name this is called, by institutions, or by organizations—whether by circulars, advertisement, or personal communication—is unprofessional. In 1917 it was

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