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Article
July 9, 1949

HYPERPYREXIA FOLLOWING THORACOLUMBAR SYMPATHECTOMYReport of Two Cases Occurring During a Heat Wave

Author Affiliations

New York
From the Department of Surgery, Post-Graduate Medical School, New York University-Bellevue Medical Center New York

JAMA. 1949;140(10):873-875. doi:10.1001/jama.1949.82900450001007
Abstract

As greater numbers of patients are subjected to thoracolumbar sympathectomy for essential hypertension, it becomes of increasing importance to learn how this operation affects the function of the organism in relation to its environment. Although it has long been known that denervation of the sympathetic nerve supply results in abolition of the sweating mechanism in the area involved, there have been to our knowledge no cases reported in which this deficiency has proved clinically deleterious to the patient.

For this reason we are reporting in detail 2 cases of hyperpyrexia which occurred during the heat wave of Aug. 25 to 30, 1948, in New York City. Both patients had almost complete absence of the sweating mechanism due to previous bilateral thoracolumbar sympathectomy done by the technic of Hinton and Lord.1

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  A. R., a 45 year old lithographer, was admitted to the hospital for the

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