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September 21, 1940

SOME FACTORS AND OBSERVATIONS ON PREPARATION AND PRESERVATION OF DILUTE PLASMA

Author Affiliations

SALISBURY, N. C.

From the laboratory of pathology, Rowan Memorial Hospital.

JAMA. 1940;115(12):1006-1008. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810380036008
Abstract

The importance of whole blood transfusion as a therapeutic agent is well recognized and established. The important role played by plasma in transfusion has not been fully appreciated. In the past the major criterion for transfusion in the majority of institutions has been the need for erythrocytes. From the ever increasing reports in the literature it is becoming apparent that the therapeutic value of transfusion in the treatment of many diseases is derived largely from the plasma rather than from the red cells. Certainly in shock without hemorrhage,1 in burns,2 for restoration and maintenance of plasma protein,3 for administration of antibodies4 and even in severe hemorrhage5 the effectiveness of plasma cannot be questioned.

The necessary delay in securing a suitable donor or in cross matching "banked" blood, if it is available, vitiates the effectiveness of transfusion in dire emergencies. Blood transfusions can be carried out

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