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September 28, 1940

THE DESIVAC PROCESS FOR DRYING FROM THE FROZEN STATE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Bacteriology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and the F. J. Stokes Machine Company.

JAMA. 1940;115(13):1095-1097. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810390035008
Abstract

During the past few years, evidence has been accumulating which supports the value of human blood plasma or serum as substitutes for whole blood transfusion.1 In the case of traumatic shock without hemorrhage where there is hemoconcentration, plasma may even be preferable to whole blood.2 Even when there is no hemoconcentration, the advantage of a blood substitute not requiring matching of type and one readily available immediately in the emergency is clear. The reduction in hemoglobin which patients can endure without danger is extreme; it is reduction in circulating blood volume which must be corrected promptly. In cases of nephrosis and of increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure as resulting from concussion, the advantage of concentrated plasma or serum is added to the other advantages by virtue of an increased osmotic effect to withdraw fluids into the circulatory system. In dry form resulting from desiccation from the frozen state the

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