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October 12, 1940

THE MORTALITY FROM ACUTE APPENDICITIS IN THE JOHNS HOPKINS HOSPITAL

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Department of Surgery, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1940;115(15):1242-1245. doi:10.1001/jama.1940.02810410008004
Abstract

It is well known that death seldom follows the competent removal of an acutely inflamed but unperforated appendix.1 At present, however, surgeons disagree as to the proper treatment of patients having acute appendicitis with one or more complications. Our own uncertainty led us to study the results of the treatment of acute appendicitis as carried out in the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

In the surgical service of the Johns Hopkins Hospital patients considered to have acute appendicitis in any stage of the disease are subjected to immediate operation. From Sept. 1, 1931, to Sept. 1, 1939, 1,317 of these patients had acute appendicitis. All cases in which there was no gross perforation of the appendix are classified under simple acute appendicitis. All those in which perforation of the appendix was found at operation (except those in which rupture was caused by handling during operation) are divided into two groups:

  1. Appendicitis with perforation and abscess

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