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January 6, 1951

Principles of Internal Medicine

JAMA. 1951;145(1):57. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.02920190059027

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Abstract

This book is intended primarily for the student and the general practitioner. In keeping with the modern trend in teaching, the authors attempted to integrate the preclinical sciences with clinical medicine so as to present the subject from the viewpoint of abnormal physiology, chemistry and psychology, as well as from the viewpoint of structural alterations. The emphasis throughout is placed on common disorders and basic principles rather than on rare clinical entities. The arrangement of the subject matter reflects the same general idea. The functional approach to the principles of internal medicine is covered in the first five parts of the book. The last two parts deal with specific infectious diseases and diseases of organ systems. Part 1, under the heading of Cardinal Manifestations of Disease, includes discussions of the major symptoms and signs of circulatory failure, renal failure and anemia. Part 2, Physiologic Considerations, deals with principles of particular

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