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February 10, 1951

RELATION BETWEEN TONSIL AND ADENOID OPERATIONS AND CLEFT PALATE

Author Affiliations

Columbus, Ohio.

JAMA. 1951;145(6):379-381. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.02920240015004
Abstract

This paper concerns the patient who has been operated on for the correction of a congenital cleft palate and a few years later has a definite infection of the palatine tonsils, a simple tonsillar hyperplasia or adenoid hypertrophy. Depending on the operator and the surgical procedure of the original cleft palate operation, the deglutitory and phonetic results should be entirely satisfactory as the child develops. In some cases in which the cleft palate has been closed and a good result secured, the physician is reluctant to have a tonsillectomy done, fearing a resultant speech defect. Later the lymphoid structure in the oropharynx and nasopharynx, as a rule, naturally undergo changes to such an extent that complications ensue, usually at the ages of two to six years. Such complications are the result of lymphoid structure infection with hypertrophy. These changes occur principally in the palatine tonsils and nasopharyngeal adenoid mass. The

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