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February 24, 1951

TERRAMYCIN, CHLORAMPHENICOL AND AUREOMYCIN IN ACUTE BRUCELLOSISA PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

Cairo, Egypt

From the United States Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3.

JAMA. 1951;145(8):553-556. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.02920260021006
Abstract

Until the advent of the antibiotics, the therapy of brucellosis was viewed with defeatism.1 The introduction of the sulfonamides and subsequently of penicillin engendered hopes for the control of this protean disease.2 However, it was soon found that these agents were only moderately effective in controlling the acute symptoms and were ineffective as curative agents. The use of streptomycin alone, or combined with a sulfonamide, gave the first genuine promise of effective treatment.3 Immediate clinical response was good, and relapses were significantly reduced. Toxicity, however, was serious.

Subsequent studies with aureomycin,4 and chloramphenicol,5 indicated even more rapid response and relatively negligible toxic manifestations. Reported relapse rates ranged up to 22 per cent. In a more recent study of the use of chloramphenicol in brucellosis, Knight and his associates6 reported six relapses in a series of 13 patients.

When terramycin hydrochloride became available, in vitro

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