[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.176.107. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
August 4, 1951

UNITED NATIONS MEDICAL SERVICE IN KOREAN CONFLICT

Author Affiliations

Chief Medical Officer, United Nations Forces in Korea

JAMA. 1951;146(14):1307-1310. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670140033009
Abstract

In offering a preliminary report on the medical activities of the United Nations Forces in Korea, I have at once an unusual privilege and a difficult task, difficult because for reasons of security I cannot quote actual statistics and because conclusions about a campaign still in progress are necessarily incomplete.

The conflict in Korea is an unusual one in many respects. Never before have fighting men of so many nations and races joined together in a campaign within a single area of comparable size. Korea is about the size of Italy, and its mountains, though more numerous and more irregular in configuration, are strikingly like the Apennines. Veterans of the Italian campaign of 1944-1945 are struck by the similarity. Climatically Korea is difficult, for it is very hot and dusty in summer and bitterly cold in winter. The Korean climate is the coldest in which American soldiers have ever fought,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×