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September 22, 1951

MYASTHENIA GRAVIS IN A MOTHER AND HER NEWBORN SON

Author Affiliations

Detroit

From the Medical Department, Harper Hospital.

JAMA. 1951;147(4):320-322. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.73670210013007f
Abstract

Myasthenia gravis is a disease that lends itself well to study. The history and physical findings are well defined, although variable. Almost absolute proof of the diagnosis is available in the test dose of neostigmine (prostigmin®). As a result, many articles are to be found in the recent literature. Numerous series of cases have been available for the study of such particular manifestations of the disease as the ocular and the bulbar. Certain aspects, however, are sufficiently rare to warrant case reports. Among these are cases of myasthenia gravis complicating pregnancy and congenital myasthenia gravis. Of the latter, a total of 10 cases has been reported, the first in 1942.1a Of the 10 cases, the congenital nature of the disease was determined by retrospect in four. In the other six cases the diagnosis was made in the neonatal period. In this report the seventh known case of myasthenia gravis

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