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December 22, 1951

PHYSIOLOGY OF GASTRIC SECRETION AND ITS RELATION TO THE ULCER PROBLEM

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Department of Surgery of the University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1951;147(17):1615-1620. doi:10.1001/jama.1951.03670340005002
Abstract

An excessive secretion of gastric juice, both in the fasting stomach and in response to the ingestion of food, has been found to be present in most, if not all, patients with duodenal and gastrojejunal ulcers, when appropriate methods for its detection have been employed. Observations on patients with peptic ulcer who have been treated by complete gastric vagotomy, supported and amplified by studies on experimental animals, indicate that this hypersecretion is the cause of the ulcers, is the chief factor which prevents them from healing, and that it is predominantly, if not exclusively, of nervous origin.

Hypertonicity and hypermotility of the stomach are likewise usually present in patients with duodenal and gastrojejunal ulcers, and are also of nervous origin. While there is no doubt that this hypertonicity and hypermotility contribute to the epigastric discomfort of these patients, they are probably of minor importance in the cause of ulcer or

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