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Article
February 23, 1952

Experimental Physiology for Medical Students

Author Affiliations
 

By D. T. Harris; M.D., D.Sc., F.Inst.P., H. P. Gilding, M.A., M.D., Professor of Physiology, University, Birmingham, and W. A. M. Smart, B.Sc., M.B., B.S. Fifth edition. Cloth. 21s. Pp. 305, with 267 illustrations. J. & A. Churchill, Ltd., 104 Gloucester Place, Portman Sq., London W.1, 1951.

JAMA. 1952;148(8):686-687. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930080096034

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Abstract

The first section of this excellent book is devoted to experiments in physiology and the second to experiments in pharmacology. Both sections afford illustrations of the handicaps under which these two subjects must be taught in England because of the lingering influence of antivivisectionists. It is gratifying, however, to find the metric system used throughout; in other respects, too, the book is abreast of the times.

Commendable are the figures, which include a sufficient number of wiring diagrams to stimulate the student's interest in audiometers and similar appurtenances of modern physical medicine. The section on special senses contains many good experiments. The experiments on taste (page 266) could be enriched by the inclusion of phenylthiourea, which not only impresses the student with the importance of individual differences but is of historic interest because of the developments that have followed its discovery. The subject of basal metabolic rate could be freed

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