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Article
March 8, 1952

CATION EXCHANGE RESINS AS AN ADJUNCT IN TREATMENT OF HEART FAILURE

Author Affiliations

Charlottesville, Va.
From the Cardiovascular Division, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Virginia

JAMA. 1952;148(10):820-824. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930100038008
Abstract

Restriction of sodium in the diet has been accepted as helpful in the management of many patients with congestive heart failure and certain patients with other forms of edema, but the ideal sodium intake cannot always be accomplished by diet alone. In 1946, Dock1 suggested that a cation resin could be used to remove sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium from ingested foods and further indicated that such a resin was nontoxic for dogs and rats. Extensive studies in animals2 have demonstrated further the absence of toxicity from cation resins over short and long periods. These observers find that prolonged administration of the ammonium form of resin has not interfered with health, nutrition, or hematological development of animals. A detailed review3 of the literature on ion exchange resins and edema discusses fully the rationale for the use of these substances.

A cation exchange resin can also restrict the absorption of sodium from the human intestine,4 and its use has been found practical and effective in man.4b,d The

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