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Article
March 15, 1952

ABERRANT PANCREAS: A CAUSE OF DUODENAL SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

Baltimore
Consulting Roentgenologist (Dr. Feldman) and Director of the Department of Laboratories (Dr. Weinberg), Sinai Hospital.

JAMA. 1952;148(11):893-898. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930110015005
Abstract

The anomaly of aberrant pancreas of the duodenum has been inadequately studied and is of sufficient clinical importance to merit more than passing interest. A consideration of this subject was stimulated by our autopsy experience concerning the high incidence of pancreatic tissue observed in the duodenum. There also seems to be a compelling need for the elucidation of the clinical significance of this condition, especially when it involves the duodenum. The accessory pancreas is a common anomalous embryological development, apparently occurring with greater frequency than may be inferred from a survey of the literature. According to the literature its incidence is comparatively low. In recorded studies the incidence varied from 0.04% to 2%. In 1,970 autopsies Duff and co-workers1 found 21 instances of aberrant pancreatic tissue, an incidence of 1%. In our 410 autopsy studies an unusually high incidence of this condition was observed, especially in the duodenum. In

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