[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.87.121.0. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 15, 1952

ROLE OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION IN A LARGE NEUROPSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL

Author Affiliations

Long Island, N. Y.
Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, Northport.

JAMA. 1952;148(11):921-924. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930110043010
Abstract

By tradition, a neuropsychiatric hospital is a place where mentally ill persons may receive shelter from the stormy blasts of life, care and attention of nursing and medical auxiliaries, and the individual attention of a psychiatrist. The concept of a neuropsychiatric hospital as a refuge often means, however, that patients are robbed of their individuality and are made to become overly dependent on the meager staff employed to administer care. It is too frequently found that neuropsychiatric hospitals still adhere to the doctrine of attempting to provide individual psychotherapeutic treatment for an individual patient by an individual psychiatrist, without facing the fact that individual psychotherapy is not a practical proposition, because of the huge number of patients confronting the psychiatric world. While it is true that radical individual treatment can free the inner drives of the emotionally ill patient, it is doubtful whether the large neuropsychiatric hospital of today, with

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×