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May 17, 1952

PREGNANCY FOLLOWING BLALOCK OPERATION FOR TETRALOGY OF FALLOT

Author Affiliations

Los Angeles
From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The California Hospital.

JAMA. 1952;149(3):266-268. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.72930200009011e
Abstract

With the more widespread use and the increasing success of the surgical attacks on congenital cardiac anomalies, it would appear that the problem of management of pregnancy in patients having been so treated would occasionally confront the obstetrician. Correction of pulmonic stenosis in the tetralogy of Fallot by means of the Blalock procedure, the Smith-Potts operation, ablation of patent ductus arteriosus, resection of aortic coarctation, and the newer procedures of valvulotomy all will tend to increase the number of women who may advisedly or inadvisedly seek successful outcome for a subsequent pregnancy. Lund,1 in reporting on pregnancy with maternal congenital cardiac disease in 1948, correctly predicted that such problems would arise in the near future. He expressed apprehension concerning those patients having surgery for the tetralogy of Fallot and urged that they be considered as serious cardiac risks, with pregnancy being undertaken only with extreme caution under constant observation.

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