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May 17, 1952

CHRONIC HYPOGLYCEMIA IN AN INFANT TREATED BY SUBTOTAL PANCREATECTOMY

Author Affiliations

Temple, Texas
From the Department of Internal Medicine (Dr. Greenlee), the Department of Surgery (Dr. White), and the Department of Pathology (Dr. Phillips), Scott & White Clinic.

JAMA. 1952;149(3):272-273. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.72930200015011h
Abstract

Shortly after the discovery of insulin by Banting and Best1 in 1922, it became apparent that severe hypoglycemia results from excessive administration of the drug. In 1924, Harris2 postulated the clinical syndrome of hyperinsulinism. It remained for Wilder and his coworkers3 to establish, in 1927, the unquestionable correlation between islet cell tumor of the pancreas and hyperinsulinism. Further evidence of the entity was offered in 1929 by Howland and his colleagues4 of Toronto, who removed an islet cell tumor from a patient with hyperinsulinism. As a result of increasing awareness of the clinical syndrome, Howard, Moss, and Rhoads,5 by 1950, were able to find recorded in the literature 264 cases of islet tumor with hyperinsulinism. The great majority of patients with this condition are adults, although the syndrome may occur at any age. Sherman6 reported the case of a baby girl with uncontrollable hypoglycemia

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