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March 28, 1953

TOXOPLASMOSIS FOUND BY RECOVERY OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII FROM EXCISED AXILLARY GLANDREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Bethesda, Md.; Washington, D. C.

JAMA. 1953;151(13):1103-1104. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.02940130049009a
Abstract

Toxoplasmosis as a disease of man was first observed by Jankû in 1923. Since that time this protozoal disease has been found with increasing frequency, especially among infants. The causative organism was first established in 1939. The disease in infants is usually manifested as a form of encephalitis with such features as hydrocephalus or microcephaly, chorioretinitis, microthalmos, and intracerebral calcification. Cases of active toxoplasmosis among adults, confirmed by isolation of the causative organism, have been relatively few in number, approximately a dozen, and often have proved fatal. These cases have usually been manifested by a prolonged remittent fever with such features as pneumonitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, and maculopapular rash, and have borne little resemblance to the disease in infants.

Toxoplasmosis of the newborn is apparently contracted from the mother, who acquires the infection during pregnancy and who, while usually free of symptoms pointing toward the disease, nevertheless, gives srologie evidence of

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