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July 19, 1952

LOW HEMOGLOBIN LEVELS IN WOMEN AS REVEALED BY BLOOD DONOR RECORDS

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.
From National Headquarters of the American National Red Cross.

JAMA. 1952;149(12):1127-1128. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930290049013
Abstract

In American Red Cross blood procurement records women constitute a minority of the donors represented. The greater response by men can be attributed largely to more intensive recruitment among male employee groups, to less fear of venipuncture, and to more widespread knowledge of the therapeutic uses of blood and its derivatives, gained while serving in the armed forces. Furnishing the stimulus for the present report, still another element of the disparity is the fact that on presenting themselves many more women than men are found to be unacceptable because of low hemoglobin levels.

Previously unpublished information concerning the incidence of low hemoglobin levels can be derived from mass data pertaining to white persons who volunteered to contribute blood in the period January, 1948, to June, 1949, inclusive.1 All ranged in age from 18 through 59. Shown in table 1 are figures on 239,191 persons (165,408 men and 73,783 women)

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