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July 19, 1952

HEMOBILIA, CHOLECYSTITIS, AND GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING WITH RUPTURE OF LIVER

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia
From the Mount Sinai Hospital.

JAMA. 1952;149(12):1132-1133. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.72930290004014a
Abstract

Subcutaneous rupture of the liver is not a rarity. Our case is of particular interest on account of the complications of hemobilia, hemorrhagic cholecystitis, gastrointestinal bleeding, hemothorax, and hydropneumopericardium, with complete recovery. The over-all mortality from hepatic rupture in general remains about 60%, that from massive rupture being higher (60% to 80% ).1

REPORT OF A CASE  R. G., 9 years of age, a white male child, sustained a severe injury to the abdomen and lower right portion of the chest at 5 p. m. on Feb. 9, 1951, when he fell from his sled into a jagged rock-filled creek. He was brought into the office 20 minutes later in a state of collapse. Shock therapy was immediately carried out with favorable response. X-rays were taken of the abdomen to determine the presence of air under the diaphragm and because of possible fracture of the ribs. The x-rays were all

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