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Article
September 6, 1952

INFLUENCE OF TV CRIME PROGRAMS ON CHILDREN'S HEALTH

JAMA. 1952;150(1):37. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.03680010043012
Abstract

Even since the number of television sets in the United States zoomed from 10,000 in 1945 to 17,000,000 in 1952, the cumulative effect of television crime-and-horror programs on the health of American children has become a source of mounting concern to parents, teachers, and the medical profession. That this medium of mass communication exerts a potent, time-consuming influence on the younger generation is indicated by surveys, which show that children 5 and 6 years old are among the most constant viewers, often watching television for four or more hours a day. Many pupils in the 7 to 17 year age group average 3 hours daily, while some watch television 27 hours a week, almost as much time as they spend in their school classes.1

The caliber of crime programs seen by television audiences is the subject of comment by the editor of TV Magazine, who supervised a study of

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