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Article
September 29, 1956

LONGEVITY AND CAUSES OF DEATH FROM IRRADIATION IN PHYSICIANS

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the Cancer Research Institute, New England Deaconess Hospital, and the Laboratory of Pathology, Harvard Cancer Commission.

JAMA. 1956;162(5):464-468. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.72970220006007
Abstract

Data bearing on effects of prolonged low-level exposure of man to ionizing radiation are few. With the use of atomic energy becoming more general and the increasing probability of large portions of the population becoming potentially exposed to radiation, the value of such data materially increases. I add herewith some observations. Radiologists and certain other groups of medical specialists, such as dermatologists, urologists, and gastroenterologists, have experienced prolonged occupational exposure near or sometimes slightly above the present permissible levels of radiation. While some of the pioneers in radiology risked themselves freely, paying with radiation-induced leukemia or carcinoma for their absorption in their new and untried tool to aid humanity, most of those utilizing ionizing radiation in their medical work have received only small doses.

Dose Levels of Irradiation  The present permissible level of total body radiation accepted by the International Committee on Radiation Protection for x-rays or gamma rays of

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