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October 27, 1956

THE EFFECT OF KNOWN REPEATED ORAL DOSES OF CHLOROPHENOTHANE (DDT) IN MAN

Author Affiliations

Savannah, Ga.

From the Communicable Disease Center, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

JAMA. 1956;162(9):890-897. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.72970260008012
Abstract

Much knowledge is available regarding the effect of repeated doses of chlorophenothane (DDT) on a variety of animals. Significant interspecies variation has been found in its toxicity when given orally, the storage of DDT in fat, and the conversion of DDT to 1,1,-dichloro-2,2-bis ( p-chlorophenyl ) ethylene (DDE). Some other aspects of the pharmacology of DDT have not been investigated sufficiently to determine whether interspecies differences are present. A final evaluation of the effect of DDT on man must be made with human subjects. The practical importance of the problem is evident from the fact that a greater tonnage of DDT than of any other insecticide is used in agriculture, that DDT occurs regularly in prepared meals,1 and that it is stored in the fat of most persons in the general population.2

An investigation was designed with the following objectives: 1. Study of possible clinical effects of different dosage

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