[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 11, 1952

OCCURRENCE OF POLIOMYELITIS IN RELATION TO TONSILLECTOMIES AT VARIOUS INTERVALS

Author Affiliations

Minneapolis

From the Herman Kiefer Hospital, Detroit, and Professor of Epidemiology and Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, College of Medical Sciences. Now Professor and Head, Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, State University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa.

JAMA. 1952;150(6):534-538. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.03680060006003
Abstract

Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease, and most persons have had it in a subclinical form by the time they become adults.1 Recognizable or paralytic cases are relatively few, and the ratio of subclinical to clinical infections is estimated at upwards of 100 to 1. Little that we know concerning the disease affords a satisfactory answer to this phenomenon. Lacking a satisfactory explanation with respect to parasite factors, some have sought an explanation in predisposing causes, and for the last three decades or more emphasis has been placed on what Aycock2 called autarceologic factors, by which is meant those physiological influences that condition a person to infection with the virus. Evidence has slowly been accumulating to show that factors other than exposure to the virus are operative. Thus, the effect of stress or trauma,3 physical activity,4 body type,5 endocrine changes,6 dietary deficiencies,7 pregnancy,8

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×