[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 9, 1957

PREDICTIVE VALUE OF LIPOPROTEIN MEASUREMENTS IN CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSISGUEST EDITORIAL

JAMA. 1957;163(6):454-455. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02970410044013
Abstract

Clinical study of atherosclerosis continues to be handicapped by inability to detect its presence, to measure its degree, and to predict the likelihood of its complications in the living body. It is not until an infarct or some other secondary manifestation of underlying atherosclerosis supervenes that its presence becomes manifest. Another handicap, now being rapidly overcome, has been the inability to measure with precision the various fatty constituents of blood and blood vessels that have long been thought to be concerned in the etiology of atherosclerosis.

Comparatively reliable methods for determining serum cholesterol values were the first to be developed. However, data accumulated in the past few years have made it evident that there is no clear answer as to whether coronary disease in a particular individual is associated causally with elevated serum cholesterol levels, although a statistical association seems likely. For this reason, the statement by Gofman and co-workers

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×