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Article
February 16, 1957

RELATION OF TONSILLECTOMY AND ADENOIDECTOMY TO POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

Evanston, Ill.

From Evanston Hospital and Northwestern University Medical School.

JAMA. 1957;163(7):519-521. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02970420001001
Abstract

• Surgical removal of tonsils and adenoids is one of the most gratifying procedures in medicine when it is properly done under the right indications. These are now rather standard: repeated severe infection of the tonsils and adenoids, persistent chronic or subacute infection with impaired general health, recurring infection with otitis and impairment of hearing, obstruction with facial and palatal deformity, or metastatic, toxic, or allergic focal infection. Statistics relating tonsillectomy to poliomyelitis have been difficult to interpret, especially because many patients may be predisposed to poliomyelitis by the same susceptibility to infection that made them candidates for tonsillectomy. Rightly done, tonsillectomy can prevent disastrous systemic damage or relieve disabling local infection. Harm can be done by denying tonsillectomy when it is badly needed.

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