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Article
February 16, 1957

SURGERY VERSUS IRRADIATION OF TONSILS AND ADENOIDS RELATIVE TO CONDUCTION DEAFNESS

Author Affiliations

San Francisco

From the Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, of the Stanford University Medical School, and the Department of Otolaryngology, Mount Zion Hospital.

JAMA. 1957;163(7):522-525. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02970420004002
Abstract

• Tonsils, and adenoids particularly, play a major role in the development of diseases that eventually cause conduction deafness. Transient hearing impairment. while reversible if treated early, may be due to painless inflammation and accumulation of fluid in the middle ear, which in turn may result from inadequate treatment of acute otitis media. The common etiology for this deafness is diseased adenoids and tonsils, usually enlarged, and recurrent masses of lymphoid tissue in the nasopharynx. Irradiation for conduction deafness has been disappointing, simulating an incomplete adenoidectomy. The most effective treatment is meticulous surgery.

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