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Article
July 20, 1957

BRUCELLOSIS IN MAN, RESULTING FROM BRUCELLA ABORTUS (STRAIN 19) VACCINE

Author Affiliations

Oakland, Calif.; Berkeley, Calif.

From the Stanford University School of Medicine (Dr. Sadusk), State of California Department of Public Health Bacteriology Laboratory (Dr. Browne), and the Donner Laboratory, University of California (Dr. Born).

JAMA. 1957;164(12):1325-1328. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.62980120003007a
Abstract

The use of a living vaccine of a low-virulence strain of Brucella abortus organisms (strain 19) is well recognized as one of the elements of control of brucellosis in cattle and dates back to the acceptance of such a vaccine by the U. S. Bureau of Animal Industry in 1940. While this vaccine has generally been considered to be innocuous to the human, Gilman1 as early as 1944 noted the occurrence of a case in man by infection through conjunctival absorption when this vaccine was inadvertently sprayed into the eye. Essentially similar accidental infections of the human have been confirmed by Spink and Thompson2 and by Bardenwerper.3

The scarcity of such reports is interesting, however, and may depend upon either of two factors: (1) that strain 19 of Br. abortus is of such low virulence that accidental infection rarely occurs or (2) that the disease produced is

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