[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 3, 1957

TRICHINOSIS INVOLVING THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEMTREATMENT WITH CORTICOTROPIN (ACTH) AND CORTISONE

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

Assistant Chief (Dr. Meltzer) and Chief (Dr. Bockman), Medical Service, Special Ward, Philadelphia General Hospital.

JAMA. 1957;164(14):1566-1569. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.62980140001007
Abstract

Trichinosis is the most common parasitic infection in many parts of the United States. About 18% of the adult population is infected, according to the general incidence at autopsy.1 This implies that the disease may very often be asymptomatic or that the clinical features of trichinosis are infrequently diagnosed. It is thought that the manifestations vary with the number of parasites present as well as with an unknown susceptibility of the host. The disease is generally considered self-limiting, although the mortality is said to be 6%.2

The most heavily infected areas are the diaphragm, intercostal muscles, and the muscles of the tongue, eyes, larynx, and neck. While any tissue of the body can probably be involved, the most serious complications are those involving the myocardium and central nervous system. The fact that the central nervous system could also be involved by the parasite has been known since 1906,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×