July 14, 1956


Author Affiliations

Alton, Ill.; Princeton, N. J.

From the Department of Medicine, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons (Dr. Smith).

JAMA. 1956;161(11):1072-1077. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.62970110006011

The "ups and downs" of German medicine and medical teaching during the past century are pretty well known to those who have given the scene a casual glance. Events of quite nonmedical nature—the course of Germany politically and ideologically—have closely governed the upward and downward slantings of its course. Although there have been internal, or medical, factors that have had their importance, the other outside influences seem to have been predominant. At the present time there is a strong upward surge in economic and political healthiness in Germany, with a vigor, a forward-looking rejuvenation, and a growing tendency to self-criticism and appraisal in the medical schools and centers of medical thinking.

The present report on the status of medical teaching in Germany is based on a four weeks' tour in February and March, 1955, at the invitation of the West German Federal Republic. We visited somewhat less than half of

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