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Article
July 14, 1956

The Neuroses in Clinical Practice

JAMA. 1956;161(11):1113. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02970110079024
Abstract

Although many books on psychiatry have been published recently, few are of value to the medical student or psychiatric resident. This book, however, is a clear and uncluttered presentation of the dynamic and phenomenological aspects of the neuroses. The author has used suggestions, aid, and editorial assistance from many notable psychiatrists. Although there are numerous references to psychotic reactions, the emphasis is on the neuroses. This is a welcome difference from the classic textbook. In his delineation of psychoanalytically based formulations, the author begins with an excellent chapter on anxiety, considering it the prime motivating force in the formation of the neuroses and the pivotal point in adjustment. Ego mechanisms of defense are instituted in response to anxiety not only with resulting psychopathology but also with resulting characterological patterns of behavior. From this point he continues with the anxiety reactions, presenting their historical, descriptive, dynamic, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects. He

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