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Article
August 25, 1956

The Menninger Story

JAMA. 1956;161(17):1716. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02970170112033

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Abstract

This story of Dr. C. F. Menninger, founder of the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, teaches that a dedicated spirit can overcome great obstacles. Dr. Menninger became a physician only after having given up the study of law and after a promising career as a teacher. He never lost sight of his mission, which was to be prepared at all times to do his best for his patients. As a result he never stopped studying, and he never stopped teaching. Although the clinic he founded is now one of the outstanding psychiatric centers in the world, the patient is treated as a whole person—body, mind, and spirit; and far from just receiving the domiciliary care that was once the beginning and end of all psychiatric treatment, the patient at the Menninger Clinic is expected to get well and usually does. The story is interestingly told, with a wealth of intimate detail.

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