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Article
May 10, 1958

METHOCARBAMOL-NEW AGENT IN TREATMENT OF NEUROLOGICAL AND NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.

Associate Professor of Neurology (Dr. O'Doherty) and Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Dr. Shields), Georgetown University Medical Center.

JAMA. 1958;167(2):160-163. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.02990190014003
Abstract

If one accepts the theory that spasticity is the result of the release of the spinal cord from the inhibition of higher centers, in both the brain stem and cortex, resulting in a sustained reflex increase in tonus, extensor in the lower and flexor in the upper extremities, then it will be seen that a drug, to be effective, must either restore the "inhibition" to the cord or break up the sustained reflex activity. The ideal lissive agent should have a long therapeutic effect, be available in an oral preparation, and, if side-effects are present, have a ratio between toxic and therapeutic dosage great enough that the side-effects are not more incapacitating than the primary condition. With methocarbamol a good result was obtained in 72% of patients with both acute and chronic spasm. An improvement in all patients with incoordination was observed. Methocarbamol is of value in muscle spasm and severe flexor spasms accompanying cord disease and has as well a more limited use in the treatment of incoordination.

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