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Article
May 10, 1958

UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION AND THE CHANGING STATUS OF PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

Evanston, Ill.

Executive Director, Association of American Medical Colleges.

JAMA. 1958;167(2):182-186. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.02990190036008
Abstract

The general consideration of this panel is to center on the problems of specialty training that are resulting from the changing status of patients. I have been asked to discuss this same development from the standpoint of undergraduate education. While sequence may make the separate consideration of undergraduate and graduate education a reasonable division of labor, the facts of their interdependence and the educational principles and concepts that they must or should share in common makes it impossible for me to think about either one without the other. Because of this, as I have developed my assignment, by both implication and digression, I have had to make some reference to specialty education. Just as the undergraduate experience should be supportive to the graduate, I hope that what I have done will provide a useful background for the papers that are to follow.

I assume that in referring to "the changing

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