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Article
May 10, 1958

PROBLEMS IN TRAINING IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY DUE TO CHANGING STATUS OF PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

Cleveland

Professor and Chairman of Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1958;167(2):202-206. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.02990190056012
Abstract

Physicians at the Congress on Medical Education and Licensure are bound together by a mutual concern for the quality of the medical care of the future. The educator is not unmindful of the hazards of today's operation or delivery nor of the need for good patient care today. But to that concern he adds a sense of responsibility—a feeling of moral obligation—for the increasing safety of the operations and deliveries of the future. He seeks to discharge this obligation by investigation and research which may contribute to the well-being of tomorrow's patients, by the teaching of tomorrow's physicians, and by the training of his own successors.

In this latter field, the area of postgraduate residency training, the greatest changes of the past 20 years have taken place.1 The creation of the various boards of certification in the specialties and the formal approval of residencies and their public listing are

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