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Article
May 17, 1958

MOUTH-TO-MOUTH VERSUS MANUAL ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Department of Surgery (Drs. Gordon, Frye, and Beattie) and the Department of Anesthesia (Dr. Gittelson), Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital, and the Department of Clinical Science (Drs. Gordon and Frye) and the Department of Anesthesia (Dr. Sadove), University of Illinois College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1958;167(3):320-328. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.72990200011008a
Abstract

In the field of manual artificial respiration, a general crystallization of ideas occurred several years ago as a result of extensive research on adult human subjects.1 This led to acceptance of "push-pull" manual resuscitation methods on a national basis.

The results of these investigations were also applied to infants and small children although comparable specific data were not available for these age groups. Many manual methods have been proposed for children, but there has never been a controlled, comparative study of their efficiency.

In October, 1955, a technique for resuscitation of infants and small children by means of manual tilting on the forearm of the rescuer was recommended by Rickard.2 In essence, he utilized the principle of the Eve rocking method.3 An important addition was use of the rescuer's finger in the victim's mouth to provide a "continuous digital airway." This interesting suggestion was not supported by

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